A motor vehicle accident is terrifying primarily because of how it has the potential to cause serious injury or even death. (Anxiety over a potentially wrecked vehicle and the ripple effect of stress is not to be overlooked either.)

You can injure just about every part of your body in a car crash, so it’s critical to seek immediate medical attention. This is the only way to obtain a clear idea of your injuries, while also implementing a treatment strategy to help you recover.

These are among the most serious types of motor vehicle accident injuries:

  • Back and neck injuries: This can range from broken vertebrae to a herniated disc among a variety of other complications. In the most serious form, back and neck injuries can result in paralysis, which will change your life forever.
  • Brain injury: This also comes in many forms, ranging from a concussion to bleeding on the brain to a fractured skull. A brain injury can impact your overall level of health, such as your ability to hold down a job or communicate with others.
  • Broken bones: The force exerted in a motor vehicle accident can result in broken bones from head to toe. This is a painful injury that requires immediate attention, long-term treatment and therapy.
  • Burn injuries: If your vehicle catches on fire as a result of the collision, you could be stuck inside until help arrives. And even if you’re able to escape on your own, you could still suffer burn injuries.
  • Lacerations and abrasions: These are common in all types of motor vehicle accidents, but particularly so in the event of ejection from your vehicle. Furthermore, if you’re riding a motorcycle, this type of injury is even more likely.

Even if you feel that you can walk away from the accident scene and treat yourself at home, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Some injuries, such as a concussion, don’t always present immediate symptoms.

You didn’t want to suffer a serious injury in a motor vehicle accident, but it’s the hand you were dealt. At that point, the best thing you can do is work closely with your medical team on a treatment and recovery plan. And as time and your health allows, you should also take steps to seek compensation from the negligent party.